MILITARY ORDER OF THE LOYAL LEGION OF THE UNITED STATES

Prominent Political Companions of the
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States


The following is a partial list of prominent or well-known Companions of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (Loyal Legion) that serve their country, state, county, and/or community in a political position. The information was obtained directly from an Internet Site hosted by Mr. Paul Hass of Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Hass, P. 2005. The Political Grave Yard, Loyal Legion, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States Political Members. http://politicalgraveyard.com/group/loyal-legion.html


Russell Alexander Alger (1836-1907) of Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan. Born in a log cabin, Lafayette Township, Medina County, Ohio, February 27, 1836. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1884; Governor of Michigan, 1885-87; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1888; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1888; U.S. Secretary of War, 1897-99; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1902-07; died in office 1907. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., January 24, 1907. Entombed in mausoleum at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Michigan. Alger County, Michigan is named for him.

John Clayton Allen (1860-1939) of McCook, Red Willow County, Nebraska. Born in Hinesburg, Chittenden County, Vermont, February 14, 1860. Republican. Secretary of State of Nebraska, 1891-95; U.S. Representative from Illinois 14th District, 1925-33; defeated, 1932, 1934; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1936. Presbyterian. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Woodmen. Died in Monmouth, Warren County, Illinois, January 12, 1939. Interment at Vermont Cemetery, Vermont, Illinois.

Larz Anderson (1866-1937) of Brookline, Norfolk County, Massachusetts. Born in Paris, France of American parents, August 15, 1866. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; U.S. Minister to Belgium, 1911-12; U.S. Ambassador to Japan, 1912-13. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion; Society of the Cincinnati. Married to author Isabel Perkins Anderson. Died in White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier County, West Virginia, April 13, 1937. Interment at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.

Chester Alan Arthur (1829-1886). Born in Fairfield, Franklin County, Vermont, October 5, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; New York Republican State Chair. 1879-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880; Vice President of the United States, 1881; President of the United States, 1881-85; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1884. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion; Psi Upsilon. Died, of Bright's disease, in New York, New York County, New York, November 18, 1886. Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, New York; statue at Madison Square Park, New York, New York. Arthur County, Nebraska is named for him. Books about Chester Alan Arthur: Thomas C. Reeves, Gentleman Boss : The Life of Chester Alan Arthur; Paul Joseph, Chester Arthur (for young readers); Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur; George Frederick Howe, Chester A. Arthur, A Quarter-Century of Machine Politics.

Warren Robinson Austin (1877-1962) of St. Albans, Franklin County, Vermont. Born in Highgate Center, Franklin County, Vermont, November 12, 1877. Republican. Mayor of St. Albans, Vermont, 1909; delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1928, 1940, 1944; U.S. Senator from Vermont, 1931-46; U.S. Representative to the United Nations, 1947-53. Congregationalist. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Farm Bureau; Loyal Legion; Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons; Elks; Odd Fellows; Rotary; Kappa Sigma. Died in Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont, December 25, 1962. Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Burlington, Vermont.

George Sherman Batcheller (1837-1908) of New York. Born in Saratoga County, New York, July 25, 1837. Lawyer; member of New York State Assembly, 1859, 1873-74, 1886, 1888-89; Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1890-92. Member, Loyal Legion. Died in 1908. Burial location unknown.

John Charles Black (1839-1915). Born in Lexington, Holmes County, Mississippi, January 27, 1839. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1888; U.S. Representative from Illinois at-large, 1893-95; U.S. District Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, 1895-99. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion. Received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action at Prairie Grove, Arkansas, December 7, 1862. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, August 17, 1915. Interment at Spring Hill Cemetery, Danville, Illinois.

Morgan Gardner Bulkeley (1837-1922) of Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut. Son of Eliphalet Bulkeley; cousin of Edwin Denison Morgan. Born in East Haddam, Middlesex County, Connecticut, December 26, 1837. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Mayor of Hartford, Conn., 1880-88; Governor of Connecticut, 1889-93; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1905-11. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion. First president of the National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs in 1876. Died in Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, November 6, 1922. Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Hartford, Connecticut.

U.S. Senator, Governor and General Ambrose Everett (Everts) Burnside, Insignia Number 889, became an original member of the Massachusetts State Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) on October 6, 1868, prior to the establishment of Rhode Island MOLLUS. He was born on May 23, 1824, in Liberty, Indiana. Burnside was accepted to the U.S. Army Academy at West Point and graduated in the top one-third of his class in 1847. After his services during the War with Mexico and the Apache Indian Wars of the 1850s, Burnside was stationed at Fort Adams in Newport, Rhode Island. In the Civil War he commanded the Rhode Island Brigade and opened the 1st Battle of Bull Run in July 1861. However, during the battle he also took command of Hunter's Division. Afterwards he was appointed Brigadier General as part of the creation of the Army of the Potomac. In 1862, he was promoted to Major General in command if the 9th Army Corps, and led his troops (who loved him) in the first major amphibious landings of the war, capturing about 90 percent of the coast of North Carolina. He was promoted to Major General of the Army and commanded the Army of the Potomac at the Battle of Fredericksburg. In 1863, President Lincoln asked him to form the Army of the Ohio with his famed 9th Corps. He then captured East Kentucky and liberated the citizens of East Tennessee in the Knoxville region. In 1864, General Grant put Burnside in command of one of his two main armies (the other under Meade) during the first phase of the Overland Campaign against Lee. President Lincoln viewed Burnside as one of his most loyal patriots. Burnside was noticeably the last person President Lincoln nodded to in friendship from his balcony at Ford's Theater the night of his assassination. Ambrose Burnside was elected to two terms as Governor of Rhode Island and served from 1866 to 1869. He became the third Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) serving two elected terms from 1871 to 1873. In 1871, as GAR Commander-in-Chief, he was a co-founder of the National Rifle Association (NRA) and became its first National President. During this time he was also asked by the U.S. State Department and the American Consulate in London, while on an American Good Will Business trip in Europe, to negotiate the safe release of American Citizens trapped in Paris during the Franco-Prussian War. He was then asked by Field Marshal Count Otto Von Bismarck and King Louis Napoleon, III, to broker the Peace Treaty between France and Germany, which lasted until World War I. In 1875, Burnside was elected to the U.S. Senate and served as Republican Chairman of the Senate Labor and Education Committee. He died of a heart attack at his home called Edghill Farm near Bristol, Rhode Island, close to the end of his Senate term on September 13, 1881 at the age of 57. He was buried with full military honors in Swan Point Cemetery in Providence, Rhode Island, after a Head of State Funeral in Washington D.C. and Rhode Island. Burnside's honest views to follow Lincoln's fair reconciliation policy during Reconstruction made him extremely popular with the people in mourning, both North and South. His death consumed so much of the nation's attention; it tended to overshadow the death of President Garfield, just six days later. To learn more about Ambrose Burnside, go to: "Rhode Island's Own: Part I". -G.A. Mierka, Past Department Commander, Rhode Island Department, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War/Commander, Rhode Island Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, March 2008

George Howland Butler (1894-1967). Born in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, February 6, 1894. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Ambassador to the Dominican Republic, 1946-48. Member, Loyal Legion. Died in 1967. Burial location unknown.

John Coburn (1825-1908). Born in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, October 27, 1825. Republican. Member of Indiana State House of Representatives, 1850-51; Presidential Elector for Indiana, 1852; state court judge, 1859-61, 1865-66; General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1867-75 (6th District 1867-69, 5th District 1869-75); member of Republican National Committee from Indiana, 1870-72; Justice of Montana Territorial Supreme Court, 1884-85. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion. Died in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, January 28, 1908. Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Grenville Mellen Dodge (1831-1916). Born in Massachusetts, April 2, 1831. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Iowa 5th District, 1867-69; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1868; member of Republican National Committee from Iowa, 1872. Member, Loyal Legion. Chief engineer of the Union Pacific Railroad. Died January 3, 1916. Interment at Walnut Hill Cemetery, Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Charles Taylor Doxey (1841-1898). Born in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, July 13, 1841. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Indiana State Senate, 1877; U.S. Representative from Indiana 9th District, 1883. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion. Died in Anderson, Madison County, Indiana, April 30, 1898. Interment at West Maplewood Cemetery, Anderson, Indiana.

Francis Marion Drake (1830-1903). Born in Rushville, Schuyler County, Illinois, December 30, 1830. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Iowa, 1896-98. Christian. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa is named for him. Died, of diabetes, in Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa, November 20, 1903. Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Centerville, Iowa.

George Fiske Dudley (b. 1867) of Washington, D.C. Born in Centerville, Wayne County, Indiana, September 25, 1867. Republican. Episcopal priest; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from District of Columbia, 1932. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Lions. Burial location unknown.

Thomas Michael Foglietta (b. 1928) of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, December 3, 1928. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1956; Republican candidate for Mayor of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1975; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1st District, 1981-97; U.S. Ambassador to Italy, 1997-?. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; Loyal Legion; Sons of Italy.

William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889) of Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky. Born in 1841. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1868, 1872, 1884; member of Republican National Committee from Kentucky, 1872-; U.S. Minister to Belgium, 1878-80. Member, Loyal Legion. Shot and killed in a violent encounter at the Post Office, Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, 1889. Burial location unknown.

Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) of Galena, Jo Daviess County, Illinois. Father of Frederick Dent Grant. Born in Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio, April 27, 1822. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; President of the United States, 1869-77; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1880. Methodist. Member, Loyal Legion. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. His portrait appears on the U.S. $50 bill, and also appeared on $1 and $5 silver certificates in 1887-1927. Died of throat cancer, at Mt. McGregor, Saratoga County, New York, July 23, 1885. Interment at General Grant Memorial, New York, New York. Grant counties in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Okalahoma, Ore., South Dakota, Washington, and West Virginia are named for him. Books about Ulysses S. Grant: Jean Edward Smith, Grant; Frank J. Scaturro, President Grant Reconsidered.

Walter Quintin Gresham (1832-1895). Born near Lanesville, Harrison County, Indiana, March 17, 1832. Republican. Member of Indiana State House of Representatives, 1861; General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1866, 1868; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1868; Judge of U.S. District Court for Indiana, 1869-83; U.S. Postmaster General, 1883-84; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1884; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, 1884-93; U.S. Secretary of State, 1893-95; died in office 1895. Methodist. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., May 28, 1895. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886). Uncle by marriage of William Rush Merriam. Born in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, February 14, 1824. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1868, 1876; candidate for President of the United States, 1880. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons. His portrait appeared on the U.S. $2 silver certificate in the 1880s and early 1890s. Died February 9, 1886. Interment at Montgomery Cemetery, Norristown, Pennsylvania. Books about Winfield Scott Hancock: David M. Jordan, Winfield Scott Hancock: A Soldier's Life.

Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901) of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana. Great-grandson of Benjamin Harrison (1726-1791); first cousin twice removed of Beverley Randolph and Burwell Bassett; grandson of William Henry Harrison (1773-1841); son of John Scott Harrison; second cousin once removed of Carter Henry Harrison; second cousin twice removed of Carter Henry Harrison II; grandfather of William Henry Harrison (1896-1990). Born in North Bend, Hamilton County, Ohio, August 20, 1833. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for Governor of Indiana, 1876; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1881-87; President of the United States, 1889-93; defeated, 1892. Presbyterian. Member, Loyal Legion; Phi Delta Theta. Died of pneumonia, in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, March 13, 1901. Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. Books about Benjamin Harrison: Susan Clinton, Benjamin Harrison : Twenty-Third President of the United States (for young readers); Rita Stevens, Benjamin Harrison, 23rd President of the United States; Harry J. Sievers, Benjamin Harrison: Hoosier President: The White House and After, 1889-1901.

Henry Baldwin Harshaw (1842-1900) of Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin. Born in Argyle, Washington County, New York, June 14, 1842. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Wisconsin State Treasurer, 1887-91. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows. Wounded at the battle of Laurel Hill, Va., 1864, and lost his left arm as a result. Died, of tongue cancer, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, December 25, 1900. Cremated; ashes interred at Riverside Cemetery, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893). Born in Delaware, Delaware County, Ohio, October 4, 1822. Republican. Lawyer; General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 2nd District, 1865-67; Governor of Ohio, 1868-72, 1876-77; President of the United States, 1877-81. Methodist. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Odd Fellows. Stricken by a heart attack at the railroad station in Cleveland, Ohio, and died that night in Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio, January 17, 1893. Original interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Fremont, Ohio; reinterment in 1915 at Spiegel Grove, Fremont, Ohio. Hayes County, Neb. is named for him. Books about Rutherford B. Hayes: Ari Hoogenboom, Rutherford B. Hayes: Warrior and President.

Charles Dewey Hilles (b. 1867) of New York, New York County, New York. Born in Belmont County, Ohio, June 23, 1867. Republican. Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1912-16; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1916, 1924, 1928, 1936, 1940; member of Republican National Committee from New York, 1924-38. Member, Loyal Legion. Burial location unknown.

Lucius Frederick Hubbard (1836-1913) of Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minnesota. Born in Troy, Rensselaer County, New York, January 26, 1836. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Minnesota State Senate 16th District, 1872-75; Governor of Minnesota, 1882-87; delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota, 1896; member of Republican National Committee from Minnesota, 1896; General in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons. Died February 5, 1913. Burial location unknown. Hubbard County, Minnesota is named for him.

Albert Johnson (1869-1957) of Hoquiam, Grays Harbor County, Washington. Born in Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, March 5, 1869. Republican. U.S. Representative from Washington, 1913-33 (2nd District 1913-15, 3rd District 1915-33). Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar. Died in the American Lake Veteran's hospital, Fort Lewis, Pierce County, Washington January 17, 1957. Interment at Sunset Memorial Park, Hoquiam, Washington.

Augustus Pearl Martin (1835-1902) of Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. Born in Abbott, Piscataquis County, Maine, November 23, 1835. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, 1884. Unitarian. Member, Loyal Legion. Died in Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 1902. Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Eben Wever Martin (1855-1932) of Deadwood, Lawrence County, South Dakota. Born in Maquoketa, Jackson County, Iowa, April 12, 1855. Republican. Lawyer; member of Dakota Territorial House of Representatives, 1885-86; U.S. Representative from South Dakota, 1901-07, 1908, 1909-15 (at-large 1901-07, 1908, 1909-13, 3rd District 1913-15). Methodist. Member, Loyal Legion. Died in 1932. Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Hot Springs, South Dakota.

George Brinton McClellan (1826-1885), Father of George Brinton McClellan (1865-1940). Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, December 3, 1826. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for President of the United States, 1864; Governor of New Jersey, 1878-81. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons. Died October 29, 1885. Interment at Riverview Cemetery, Trenton, New Jersey. Books about George B. McClellan: Stephen W. Sears, George B. McClellan: The Young Napoleon.

William McKinley, Jr. (1843-1901) of Canton, Stark County, Ohio. Fourth cousin once removed of Henry Prather Fletcher. Born in Niles, Trumbull County, Ohio, January 29, 1843. Republican. Major in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1877-84, 1885-91 (17th District 1877-79, 16th District 1879-81, 17th District 1881-83, 18th District 1883-84, 20th District 1885-87, 18th District 1887-91); delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1888; Governor of Ohio, 1892-96; President of the United States, 1897-1901; died in office 1901. Methodist. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 bill from about 1928 until 1946. Shot by Leon Czolgosz, at a reception in the Temple of Music, at the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, New York, September 6, 1901, and died eight days later, in Buffalo, Erie County, New York, September 14, 1901. Interment at McKinley Monument, Canton, Ohio; statue at Lucas County Courthouse Grounds, Toledo, Ohio. McKinley County, New Mexico is named for him. Books about William McKinley: Lewis L. Gould, The Presidency of William McKinley.

William Edward McLean (1832-1906), Nephew of Grafton Fleener Cookerly; step-son-in-law of James Hughes. Born in Calvert County, Maryland, October 12, 1832. Member of Indiana State Senate, 1857-60, 1893-96; member of Indiana State House of Representatives, 1861, 1867-68; Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1876. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Odd Fellows. Died in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Indiana, November 6, 1906. Interment at Highland Lawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Indiana.

George Arthur Paddock (1885-1964) of Evanston, Cook County, Illinois. Born in Winnetka, Cook County, Illinois, and March 24, 1885. Republican. Major in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Representative from Illinois 10th District, 1941-43. Member, American Legion; Loyal Legion. Died December 29, 1964. Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois.

George Clement Perkins (1839-1923) of Oakland, Alameda County, California. Born in Kennebunkport, York County, Maine, August 23, 1839. Republican. Member of California State Senate, 1869-77; Governor of California, 1880-83; U.S. Senator from California, 1893-1915. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar. Died February 26, 1923. Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, California.

John Raines (1840-1909) of Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York. Brother of Thomas Raines and George Raines. Born in Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York, May 6, 1840. Republican. Lawyer; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of New York State Assembly, 1881-82, 1885; member of New York State Senate, 1886-89, 1895-1909 (28th District 1886-89, 26th District 1895, 42nd District 1896-1909); U.S. Representative from New York 29th District, 1889-93; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1900 (alternate), 1904, 1908 (alternate). Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons. Died December 16, 1909. Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Canandaigua, New York.

John McAllister Schofield (1831-1906). Born in Gerry, Chautauqua County, N.Y., September 29, 1831. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1868-69. Member, Loyal Legion. Received the Medal of Honor in 1892 for action at Wilson's Creek, Missouri, August 10, 1861. Died in St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Florida, March 4, 1906. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891), Son of Charles Robert Sherman; adoptive son of Thomas Ewing; brother of John Sherman. Born in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, February 8, 1820. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1869. Member, Loyal Legion. In 1864, he led Union troops who attacked and burned Atlanta, Georgia. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Died in New York, New York County, New York, February 14, 1891. Interment at Calvary Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri.

Oliver Lyman Spaulding (1833-1922), Son-in-law of John Swegles, Jr. Born in Jaffrey, Cheshire County, New Hampshire, August 2, 1833. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; Secretary of State of Michigan, 1867-70; U.S. Representative from Michigan 6th District, 1881-83. Episcopalian. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., July 30, 1922. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

Peter John Sullivan (1821-1883) of Ohio. Born in Ireland, 1821. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to Colombia, 1867-69. Member, Loyal Legion. Died in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, March 2, 1883. Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.

John Stevenson Tarkington (1832-1923) of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana. Nephew of William Clayborne Tarkington; father-in-law of Ovid Butler Jameson; father of Newton Booth Tarkington; grandfather of John Tarkington Jameson and Donald Ovid Butler Jameson. Born in Centerville, Wayne County, Indiana, June 24, 1832. Republican. Lawyer; member of Indiana State House of Representatives, 1863; defeated, 1860; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Circuit Judge, 1870-72. Methodist. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion. Died in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, January 30, 1923. Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana.

James Wolcott Wadsworth, Jr. (1877-1952) of Mt. Morris, Livingston County, New York; Grandson of James S. Wadsworth; son-in-law of John Milton Hay; son of James Wolcott Wadsworth; father-in-law of William Stuart Symington; grandfather of James Wadsworth Symington. Born in Genesee, Livingston County, New York, August 12, 1877. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; member of New York State Assembly, 1905-10; Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1906-10; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1908, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1936, 1940; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1912; U.S. Senator from New York, 1915-27; defeated (Republican), 1926; U.S. Representative from New York, 1933-51 (39th District 1933-45, 41st District 1945-51). Episcopalian. Member, Grange; Loyal Legion. The Senate's leading opponent of woman suffrage. Died in 1952. Interment at Temple Hill Cemetery, Genesee, New York.

Stuyvesant Wainwright II (b. 1921) of Wainscott, Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. Born in New York, New York County, New York, March 16, 1921. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from New York 1st District, 1953-61; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1956. Member, Loyal Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons.

George Post Wheeler (1869-1956). Born in Owego, Tioga County, New York, August 6, 1869. U.S. Minister to Paraguay, 1929-33; U.S. Minister to Albania, 1933-34. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons. Published poet. Died in 1956. Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Hopkinsville, Kentucky.



Return to MOLLUS Home Page

Return to MOLLUS Web Site Index Page


KGH